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ALBUM REVIEW: ERIC AMBEL, “Roscoe Live: Vol. 1 (Live @ Livestock 2016) from PopDose by Rob Ross 2.2.17

LAKESIDE LOUNGE OWNER RELEASES A MUSICAL HOMAGE TO HIS OLD DIVE BEDFORD & BOWERY 6.21.16

First Album in 11-Years – Packs In Mood, Nuance, Tradition, R&R Heart & Attitude: ERIC AMBEL LAKESIDE BY JOHN APICE, NO DEPRESSION 6.19.16

Lakeside, a fitting tribute to the club and Ambel’s clear, purist vision of rock ‘n roll in the face of the barbarians at the gate by Mike Jurkovic Elmore Magazine 6.1.16

Eric Ambel: Lakeside by Fred Mills III for Blurt Online The Upshot: An ace collaboration between Roscoe and Jimbo Mathus, it’s also one of the purest gut-level rock ‘n’ roll albums you’re likely to hear all year. 4.27.16

ERic Ambel: Lakeside by Richard Sandford: The AgitReader 4.19.16

Album Review: Eric Ambel-Lakeside by Bill Kopp 4.15.16

Eric Ambel: The Swiss army knife of roots rock by Blaine Schultz: Milwaukee Scene 4.13.16

Views of lakefront inspire vinyl record from Lake Geneva News 4.13.16

THE ALTERNATE ROOT: LAKESIDE REVIEW with 3 songs in the player 4.10.16

ERIC AMBEL’S NEW LAKESIDE RECORD CAPTURES THE GUITARMEISTER AT THE TOP OF HIS GAME 4.6.16 New York Music Daily

VIDEO PREMIERE: ERIC AMBEL SHARES CATCHY ROCKER “HERE COME MY LOVE” OFF NEW SOLO LP ‘LAKESIDE’ 4-6-16 From Glide Magazine

THE ALTERNATE ROOT TOP TEN SONGS OF THE WEEK 3-26-16 featuring “Have Mercy” from Eric Ambel’s “Lakeside” album

AMERICANA MUSIC SHOW: INTERVIEW WITH CALVIN POWERS  March 16.  Calvin plays several cuts from the upcoming “Lakeside” album

WGN RADIO CHICAGO: INTERVIEW WITH DAVE HOEKSTRA March 13

VIDEO PREMIER: ERIC AMBEL “DON’T MAKE ME BREAK YOU DOWN” by Fred Mills, Blurg Magazine Feb 26,2016

Music Scene: Eric Ambel Does It All by Jay N. Miller, Patriot Ledger Feb 26, 2016

Eric Ambel speaks with the Enquirer about the Del-Lords and the making of “Elvis Club”

Blurt Online’s Steve Pick review’s the new Del-Lord’s record “Elvis Club”

Concert Review: The Roscoe Trio at Lakeside Lounge 3/32/10

Concert Review: The Roscoe Trio at Lakeside Lounge 6/15/07

Eric “Roscoe” Ambel’s Urban Roots Corral: Mix Magazine 1/1/2005

Rolling Stone Magazine on Knucklehead

Issue 952/953
July 8-22, 2004

By DAVID FRICKE
Singer/guitarist/songwriter Eric Ambel is no knucklehead. He is many other things: an alumnus 1980’s roots-punk band The

Del-Lords; member of both Steve Earle’s band the Dukes and cheerful hell raisers the Yayhoos; running buddy of the Skeletons and the Bottlerockets’ leader of his own cool crew, Roscoe’s Gang.

Ambel gives you some of everything in this hat trick: two ace reissues (Roscoe’s Gang, from 1988, ‘94’s Loud & Lonesome) and a new, jumpin’ trawl thru the outtakes drawer, which yields a knuckle-cracking Del-Lords cover of the Flamin’ Groovies “Shake Some Action” and a home-cooked take on Tom Waits

“Union Sqare”, in which Ambel rocks like the ’72 Rolling Stones-all my himself.

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No Depression Magazine on Loud & Lonesome

Issue #2
Winter 1995

By MITCH MEYERS                                                                                                                                                                                  It sounds like Eric Ambel has accomplished exactly what he set out to do on Loud and Lonesome (ESD). These forceful songs are mostly about being confused, hurt, and generally pissed off with the state of our union. His record is also haunted by the pervasive spirit of Neil Young. Whether its Crazy Horse-styled guitar heroics or a harmonica blowing over an estranged confessional. One listen, and you’ll feel mighty Neil, guaranteed.

This is not to say Ambel is yet another imitator of Americana’s godfather. On this album, he has absorbed Young’s music quite naturally into his own. He is fervent and sincere in the guise of Roscoe, a weary outsider looking in. With a hard rocking trio, we find ‘Scoe yowling at those American Stars N’ Bars. His words and music are emotionally direct, and proudly displayed for our inspection.

Ambel immediately gets our attention on the opening cut, “Song For The Walls,” clubbing us over the head with some savage guitar work. His urgent guitar playing repeatedly breaks through the themes of self-imposed isolation. “I’m Not Alone,” is another insular bombast with a hard, stripped-down sound; reminding us that everybody knows this is nowhere. Amplifiers feedback while Ambel and his lumbering rhythm section pound out riff-rocking tales of the lost and disenfranchised.

Loud & Lonesome embraces a bittersweet home on the grange; “I was burned out in the depot, looking for a ticket out. Three feet under, three feet left to go, when she turned my head around.” is intoned over a simple, country-rock backbeat on “Three Feet Under.” “Downtown At Midnight” takes a long, slow walk through The Last Picture Show; you can feel the specter of good times gone. To wrap things up, Roscoe goes it alone with a hillbilly hand-me-down, “Red Apple Juice.”

Eric Ambel has a rock n’ roll heart. He’s been a central member of Brooklyn’s Del-Lords since the early eighties and was one of Joan Jett’s Blackhearts before that. Lately, he has worked as a producer with bands like the Bottle Rockets and the Blood Oranges, fleshing out their No Depression sound. Ambel and Dan Baird (of the Georgia Satellites) have also put together a revved-up band of shitkickers called the Yay-Hoo’s. Amongst all of this, Eric Ambel & Roscoe’s Gang have managed to serve up a fine slice of American pie, God bless ‘em.

Rolling Stone Magazine on Roscoe’s Gang

Issue 556/557
July 13, 1989

By HOLLY GLEASON                                                                                                                                                                       This is the record Keith Richards should’ve made – it’s raw, ragged and risky. Eric Ambel (guitarist for the Del Lords) and friends spin out on a few inspired covers: Bob Dylan’s “If You Gotta Go, Go Now,” Swamp Dogg’s “Total Destruction to Your Mind” and Buck and Bonnie Owens’s classic “Loose Talk,” featuring Golden Palomino Syd Straw. The songs run from nasty (fellow Del Lord Scott Kempner’s “Don’t Wanna Be Your Friend”) to giddy (“The Girl That I Ain’t Got”) and twangy (“Next to the Last Waltz,” written with Peter Holsapple).

This is roots rock at the intersection of country and blues. The vocals are barked out, the guitars strung with barbed wire. The production is frenzied and loose. Yet Ambel and folks like Straw, Holsapple, Skid Roper and the reformed Morells sound both driven and dangerous, as if they were fueled by a couple of six-packs and a jug of moonshine.

Records don’t sound like this anymore, and that’s a shame. Soul has given way to slickness, and power to predictability, which makes Roscoe’s Gang sound even more commanding. Though it won’t outsell Poison, it hits harder and reminds us what rock & roll’s all about.